Romantic and Civil War Patterns 1830-1868

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    **FREE pattern Diagram and cutting layout**
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    This petticoat is especially suited for eyelet, but can easily be made of any fabric. It is very easy to put together, yet looks absolutely fabulous. It has a double layer hem, with the outer layer being an eyelet ruffle. Closure in the center back. And best of all, no hemming needed!

     

    • $0.00

    Score: 3.67 (votes: 3)
    3
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    The Elliptical cage crinoline was the main support foundation for the later- and post-Civil War period of 1863-1868. Called a "cage" because of the cage-like appearance created by the hoop wires and vertical support tapes, this type of crinoline offers maximum support capabilities for a perfect shape, combined with flexibility for comfortable wear. Our Elliptical shape is narrow over the hips, close to the body in front, and dramatically expanded to the rear; the most popular shape for 1865-1866 skirts.

    Our crinoline is 126" in circumference at the hem, 36" in length to hem level, and has 12 hoop wires to support the weight of heavy skirts. The self-supporting, elliptical shape is maintained by strategically placed vertical supports, as well as ties on the inside of the 4 top hoops. A "bag" at the hem keeps the wearer from stepping through the hoops.

    This pattern is now also avialable as an E-Pattern.   Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $13.50

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    2
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    This style of chemise can be found as early as 1865, and lasts through the Victorian Period. The neckline is finished with a moderately low, round yoke, with a pointed front/round back. It has a button at each shoulder, which will allow the shoulder straps to be dropped for wear under low, or off-shoulder bodices.


    The drawers have a fitted waistband with a center front button closure. The crotch seam is left open and is finished with bias tape facings. The legs are finished with a plain hem, at mid-calf length, as is common for 1860s drawers.

    Recommended fabrics: Muslin, broadcloth, flannel, linen, silk, or other natural fiber materials.

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    The Round cage crinoline was the main support foundation for the period of 1855-1862. Called a "cage" because of the cage-like appearance created by the hoop wires and vertical support tapes, this type of crinoline offers maximum support capabilities for a perfect shape, combined with flexibility for comfortable wear.

    Our crinoline is 126" in circumference at the hem, 36" in length to hem level, and has 10 hoop wires to support the weight of heavy skirts. A "bag" at the hem keeps the wearer from stepping through the hoops.

    This pattern in now also available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $12.25

    Score: 4.33 (votes: 3)
    2
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    The walking cage crinoline is a mid-sized support foundation for the period of 1856-1866. Called a "cage" because of the cage-like appearance created by the hoop wires and vertical support tapes, this type of crinoline offers maximum support capabilities for a perfect shape, combined with flexibility for comfortable wear. This cage is in a domed shape, perfect for the years 1856 - 1860. We have added a cincher style belt for ease of wear.

    Our crinoline is 110" in circumference at the hem, 33" in length to hem level, and has 8 hoop wires to support the weight of heavy skirts. A "bag" at the hem keeps the wearer from stepping through the hoops.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    This pattern if for an assortment of chemisettes and cuffs, suitable for the 1860's. The chemisettes are perfect for filling in a low cut diner bodice, making it more suitable for day wear.  You can also add interest to a more conservative neckline, with just the collar showing. The cuffs can fill out wide sleeves, or give a nice finish to a narrow sleeve.

    There are three full chemisette styles: Plain Front, Tucked Front, and Gathered Front. Both the Plain and Tucked Fronts have a center front button closure. The Gathered Front is buttoned closed at the collar and waist only. All the versions have a waistband that holds the chemisette in place at the waistline. There are 3 styles of Collar to add to the chemisette: a Shaped Stand, Pointed
    Fall, and Large Fall. Both the Pointed and Large Fall collars also have a small stand. All of the collar varieties are interchangeable with any of the chemisette styles.

    There are two styles of undersleeve with a choice of three cuffs. The first is a full gathered under-sleeve, which gathers into a fitted upper sleeve section, and gathers at the cuff. The second is a
    semi- fitted under-sleeve style, with moderate gathers at the wrist, and easing to fit the upper sleeve section. There are three interchangeable cuff styles: a rounded Shaped Cuff, a moderately Tall Cuff, and a narrow Band Cuff.

    • $13.25

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
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    This skirt is an original design based on elements and ideas in use during the 1850's and 1860's. The top skirt is pulled up in swags, revealing a box pleated ruffle underneath. Double box pleats at the waist complete the look. If desired, contrasting fabrics may be used, or a single tone is very elegant. Garnish the swags with flowers or bows. This is a very elegant skirt, that is also easy to make. Made out of cotton calico, this pattern is a nice "country" ball gown and picnic dress. Richer materials and elaborate trims make this a skirt fit for a high society evening. This skirt fits best over TV141 Cage Crinoline.

    • $13.00

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    1
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    Flounced skirts were the height of fashion throughout the 1850's. The number of flounces on a skirt varied, as did the size of the flounces. The Four flounce skirt was a favorite from 1854-56, but examples are seen as early as 1853 and as late as 1858. Also popular was a Three Flounced skirt, which is the same shape as the Four, but the top flounce is omitted. This version is seen as early as 1843, and as late as 1859.

    Used for both day dresses and ball gowns, the flounced skirt is universal throughout the period. Examples of fabrics used range from heavy plush, wool, and silk, to sheer fabrics and prints.

    This pattern fits best over TV142 - 1856 Walking Cage Crinoline. But we also have given instructions for adapting this pattern to fit over TV141- 1858 Round Cage Crinoline. The closure is in the center back, and the skirt is gauged onto the waistband. The flounces are gathered onto a cord. Shown at right as a petticoat over TV142.

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    Revere styles skirt are shown in fashion plates from 1861 to 1864. The overskirt can be
    short, as in view A, or reaching to the hem, and any length in between. But in each case, the
    overskirt is in panels, with the bottom corners flipped back to reveal a contrasting lining, and the
    skirt underneith. View A, with the 3 ruffles at the hem, is more suited for evening dresses, while
    View B with a single flounce is suited for both day and evening styles.

    For an evening dress, the top skirt could be made of a sheer fabric or net, showing the
    entire underskirt through the fabric. For winter, velvets, silks, or fine wools look nice. Or use
    silk or cotton prints, with solid-colored reveres and ruffle for a light and airy summer dress.

    This pattern fits over both TV142 - 1856 Walking Cage Crinoline, and TV141- 1858
    Round Cage Crinoline. The closure is in the center back, and the skirts are pleated to the
    waistband. The flounces are gathered over a cord and sewn to the base skirt.

    This pattern is now also available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    This skirt design was very popular in the late 1850's, and is seen in most fashion magazines during this period. Just as the name implies, is has an underskirt with a flounce, and a top skirt. The skirt base can be made of lining fabric to economize, or of dress fabric. The wide lower flounce gives lots of fullness at the hem (a total of 225"), to fit over any size hoop.

    The most common style of trimming shown for this skirt is on the lower edge of the upper skirt. The lower flounce was usually left plain. Stripes, fringe, lace, ruffles, and puffings were all used.

    • $14.00

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    1
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    This skirt design was first seen in 1847, and again later in 1851, both times as a ball gown. The skirt base can be made of lining fabric to economize (may be seen slightly), or of dress fabric. The petals can be made or a shear fabric if desired. Although designed to fit as a pre-hoop skirt, the extra wide lower flounce gives enough fullness at the hem (a total of 225"), to fit over any size hoop.

    The most common style of trimming shown is for the Petals to be trimmed with fabric ruches or lace ruffles. The lower flounce was trimmed with three rows of fabric ruches, or with lace ruffles.

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    This skirt is of the style used during late and post Civil War period.   It is designed to be worn over TV103, Elliptical Cage Crinoline.  The front and sides are gored, fitted to the waist with a pleat at each seam.  The full back is tightly gathered into a few inches.  This skirt has 9 panels in all, and is about 185" at the hem  The placket is in the center back seam.  A pocket is in the right side seam.  The hem is 42" long in front,  lengthening in back to 49", for floor length all around the elliptical cage.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.
     

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    This bodice is in three pieces, Front, Side, and Back, the most common style of the early Victorian period. The shoulder is cut with an elongated line, and is finished with a large Modified Pagoda sleeve, which is fitted at the armhole, but full below the elbow. Optional necklines, either high necked for day wear, or an open square neck for evening events. The front can be either straight across, or a shallow point at the waist.

    This bodice now comes with an Undersleeve and collar pattern!!

    • $13.25

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    1
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    This is a loose fitting blouse, which first appeared in 1861, as a female version of a soldier's uniform worn during the Civil War. Originally, it was of red wool with trimmings across the shoulders, down the center front, around the belt, and at the cuffs. This blouse was gathered into a waistband, and worn over the skirts. By 1862, the term "Garibaldi" began to be used for any loose blouse with bishop sleeves. At this same time, the blouse began to be cut longer and was then tucked into the waistband of the skirt. Prior to 1865, the blouse would be partially hidden from view by a Zuave or Spanish Jacket. After 1865, the blouse could be worn with a simple belt. A white linen version called a "Canezou" appeared, with tucks and lace trimmings covering the front, shoulders, and sleeves.

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    This bodice fits just off the shoulder for evening wear. It reaches to the waist and has a point in front and back. An optional gathered bertha trims the neckline. The closure is in the center back, with hooks and eyes. The sleeve is a small pouf with a fitted lining. A double bow decorates the shoulders. This style is particularly suited to 1850-1873, but can be used for other periods as well. Heavy decorations at the neckline will give an elegant look to the bodice.

    This pattern is now also available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern lising.

    • $12.75

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 5)
    5
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