Natural Form Patterns 1877-1882

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    This is a chemise and drawers combined into one garment. This style of underwear first appeared in 1876, and was very popular due the reduction in bulk at the waist of a more fitted type of undergarment. Very comfortable to wear and versatile, this underwear is indispensable for the reenactor of all periods. With 3 different necklines, this garment can be used under virtually any dress, both day and evening styles. The crotch seam is left open and is finished with facings. The legs are finished with a simple band below the knee. The center front closes with buttons.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    ** This pattern is an updated version of the discontinued TV121 petticoat pattern.**
    The detachable train has been redesigned to work better and to fit under the TV225 Fantail Skirt.

    This petticoat  is designed to give support behind the knees for tied-back or Natural Form style skirts of 1877-1882.  It is slim in front, and lightly gathered to the waistband at the front and sides.  The back has a pillowed section of gathered rows of netting which hold out the full back.  The closure is in the center front seam.  Two 6" ruffles are added to the hem all around.  The detachable train buttons onto the back of the petticoat just below knee height, and down the side back seams.  Matching rows of ruffles follow the hem of the train. 

    The petticoat by itself is perfect for under floor length, Natural Form skirt, like TV221 - 1877 Tie-back Skirt.  Add the train, and it supports TV225 - 1878 Fantail Skirt beautifuly.  This petticoat is also great for wear under 1890-91 skirt that need slimness in front and fullness behind.

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    This pattern contains instructions for four different petticoats, suitable for the years 1870-1897. Historically accurate, these petticoats are perfect to help hold the silhouettes required for each individual era. The front is fitted with darts at the waist to help eliminate bulk. The closure is in the center back with a drawstring, for all views. The middle flounce has optional tucks to help stiffen the petticoat.

    View 1
    1870-1876 - Early bustle.
    This version is a full flounced petticoat with extra length in the back to fit over a bustle.

    View 2
    1877-1882 - Natural Form.
    This version has a slim front and does not fit over a bustle. Suitable for under Tie-Back style skirts. Also works well for 1890-1891 slim skirts.

    View 3
    1883-1889 - Late Bustle.
    This petticoat has the slim front needed for this era, plus has a full back with extra length to fit over a bustle.

    View 4
    1890-1897 - Bell Epoch.
    This skirt has the full front needed to hold the wide skirts fashionable during this period. Does not fit over a bustle.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $13.50

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
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    This skirt is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1870's. It may be worn with an overskirt or polonaise, or trimmed heavily and worn alone with a cuirass bodice. The skirt is slim in front and is tied on the inside in back, to wrap around the body leaving the center back fullness free. It has the traditional 5 gores and a full back width. The closure is in the left side-back seam. An optional 12" ruffle can be added to the hem of the skirt. This skirt works best if worn with Petticoat TV121.

    Trimming can make this a very elaborate skirt for a ball gown. Left plain, it makes a great walking skirt. Wear it with different overskirts to get different looks.

    This pattern is now also available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    This skirt is drafted based on a garment as seen in an 1878 Arthur's Home Magazine. The front is in 3 gores, fitted at the waist with darts. The back is tied in behind the knees with a drawstring and the train flares dramatically in fan shape, also known today as a "fishtail". The closure is in the center back seam. If desired, this skirt can be also be cut to floor length.

    This skirt is suitable for just about any type of dress during the period of 1878-1882. It should be elaborately trimmed if worn by itself. It also works well under overskirts and polonaises.

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    This skirt is drafted based on an actual garment as seen in Harper's Bazaar magazine. The front hangs in low swags, and is held into the tie-back position with tapes. The back is left to hang in low swags. The closure is in the left side back seam. If desired, this skirt can be also be sewn into the side seams of underskirt TV221 to create a single double layered skirt.

    This skirt is suitable for just about everything during the period of 1878-1883. It can be left plain for day wear, or elaborately trimmed for evening. This pattern works best with a crisp, less drapey fabric.

    This pattern is now also available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    This skirt is drafted based on an actual garment as seen in Demorest Monthly magazine. The front consists of an apron and pannier. The apron drapes to two points with pleats at the center front and sides. Over this is a pannier, which fans to the sides. The back is left to hang in low swags, and has a square tail for floor length skirts, or is in an oval for trained skirts. The closure is in the center back. If desired, this skirt can be also be sewn into the side seams of underskirt TV225 to create a single, layered skirt.

    This skirt is suitable for the period of 1878-1883. It can be left plain for day wear, or elaborately trimmed for evening.

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    Our Split Pannier Overskirt is drafted based on an actual garment as seen in an 1880 The Delineator magazine. It is a very simple overskirt, with only a center back seam, the fronts being fitted with darts. Gathers at the front and sides produce the pannier effect, which was very fashionable from 1879 to 1883. The square front panels fall away to reveal an underskirt below, while the back is held in place with drawstrings and allowed to droop below the knee. This design is particularly suited to be worn over the trained Fantail Skirt, but works equally well with a walking length skirt.

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    This bodice is high necked for day wear or can be cut into a low square neck for evening events. The front can be either straight across or rounded in front and back. This style is particularly suited to 1878 - 1882. The fitted sleeve is in 2 pieces, and can be made either full- or 3/4-length. The ball gown sleeve is a small pouf.

    The bodice is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1870's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the bodice seams are true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle.

    This pattern is now also avialable as an E-Pattern.   Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    This style is particularly suited to 1878 - 1882, and is perfect for dinner and evening events. The neckline is high at the neck in back and cut in a low diamond in front. A small half collar is optional. The bodice is cuirass length in front and has a longer square "tail" in back. The fitted sleeve is in 2 pieces, and can be made either full- or 3/4-length.

    The bodice is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1870's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the bodice seams true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle.

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    This bodice is designed after styles shown in many fashion magazines of 1875-1880. The front of this bodice has a simulated vest portion. This vest can be of a different fabric and trimmed to effect. The back has long seams that reach up to the shoulder. The center back portion can be made of a different color like the vest, or of the same fabric as the rest of the bodice. The hip is bluntly pointed at the center front and center back, and the sides curve upward over the hip. The sleeve is in 2 pieces, and can be made either full length, princess length, or with a flared cuff. The collar is the pointed roll that was very popular during this period.

    The bodice is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the late 1870's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the bodice seams true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle.

    Updated in CAD format, with larger size range.

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    This style is particularly suited to 1878 - 1882, and is perfect for daytime events. This jacket has a roll down collar with lapels, and is cut away at the center front below the waist. The bodice hem can be made in two styles, either with two points and shaped over the hips, or long on both sides and back. The side back seams open up into pleats below the hip for added fullness. The fitted sleeve is in 2 pieces, and can be made either full length with a cuff, or 3/4 length.

    The bodice is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1870's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the bodice seams true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle.

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    Truly Victorian's 1878 Polonaise is modeled from the graceful designs of the new "Sheath" dresses that began in the late 1870's. This fashionable pattern is given in two variations, both are suitable for handsome gowns in which one all-over fabric or two compatible fabrics can be used. View A is long in the front. The sides are pleated up toward the back. Smaller pleats near the front create soft folds below the knee. View B has a center front panel which is pulled up into gathers on both sides below the waist. The side is allowed to fall into points before being swept back into pleats. The back view for both gowns is the same. Long seams go from shoulder to hem, allowing for the center back to be made in a second fabric to give a two-toned look, if this is desired. The tail is bunched behind the knee with gathering ties pulling the gown toward the back as is the fashion of these years. The fronts can be made in the same contrasting fabric as the back, or there is an optional bib that can be applied over the front to extend the back contrasting fabric to the front neck area only. This polonaise can be worn over a trained, or floor length skirt. The closure is in the center back and can be closed with buttons, hooks/eyes, or laced.


    This garment is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle. The skirt length is drafted to fit a measure of 40", from waist to hem, at the front. It is strongly advisable to make a mockup of the bodice, before cutting out your fashion fabric, to check fit.

     Skirt not included with this pattern. Can be worn over TV221 or TV225

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, or that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    Truly Victorian's 1878 Polonaise is modeled from the graceful designs of the new "Sheath" dresses that began in the late 1870's. This fashionable pattern is given in two variations, both are suitable for handsome gowns in which one all-over fabric or two compatible fabrics can be used. View A is long in the front. The sides are pleated up toward the back. Smaller pleats near the front create soft folds below the knee. View B has a center front panel which is pulled up into gathers on both sides below the waist. The side is allowed to fall into points before being swept back into pleats. The back view for both gowns is the same. Long seams go from shoulder to hem, allowing for the center back to be made in a second fabric to give a two-toned look, if this is desired. The tail is bunched behind the knee with gathering ties pulling the gown toward the back as is the fashion of these years. The fronts can be made in the same contrasting fabric as the back, or there is an optional bib that can be applied over the front to extend the back contrasting fabric to the front neck area only. This polonaise can be worn over a trained, or floor length skirt. The closure is in the center back and can be closed with buttons, hooks/eyes, or laced.


    This garment is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle. The skirt length is drafted to fit a measure of 40", from waist to hem, at the front. It is strongly advisable to make a mockup of the bodice, before cutting out your fashion fabric, to check fit.

     Skirt not included with this pattern. Can be worn over TV221 or TV225

    Limit one download per purchase.

    • $11.50

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    Historically designed to be worn in semipublic and with a corset, this casual gown is perfect for teas or morning breakfasts. True to the non-bustled, Natural Form style, the skirt portion is slim in the front with the back flaring for a full train. This gown is cut in princess style, with no seams at the waistline. With the watteaux back, this gown is perfect as a tea gown. With the plain back, this dress can be suitable for regular day wear. Fitted to the body with double darts, the front closes from neck to hem with buttons or frogs. The hem can be either trained or sweep length. The fitted sleeve is in two pieces. This gown can be fully boned, or lightly boned, as the wearer prefers.

    The bodice is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1880's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the bodice seams are true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle. The skirt length is drafted to fit a measure of 40", from waist to hem, at the front.

    • $19.50

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