Late Bustle Patterns 1883-1889

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    This petticoat bustle is based on an actual garment as seen in Harper's Bazaar magazine. This pattern will create a moderate sized bustle, proportioned to your hip size (one size does not fit all). It can be used as support for either 1870's or 1880's style of bustle dress. When combined with the TV170 Victorian Petticoat, you have the perfect foundation for you bustle dresses. This petticoat has a center front closure, and four hoop bones built into the back. This design allows for structural support for heavy skirts combined with ease of movement and wearability (you can sit down without making any adjustments to the bustle!!)

    No other bustle pattern can offer this amount of comfort and style. Just put it on and forget it.  Petticoat will also fold flat for ease of storage.

    See Related Products below for precut and tipped bustle wire sets!

     

    This pattern is now also available as an E-Pattern. Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $13.50

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 4)
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    This is a chemise and drawers combined into one garment. This style of underwear first appeared in 1876, and was very popular due the reduction in bulk at the waist of a more fitted type of undergarment. Very comfortable to wear and versatile, this underwear is indispensable for the reenactor of all periods. With 3 different necklines, this garment can be used under virtually any dress, both day and evening styles. The crotch seam is left open and is finished with facings. The legs are finished with a simple band below the knee. The center front closes with buttons.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    In a search for a bigger, better bustle we have come up with the Imperial Tournure. Tournure is the French term for bustle. Based on the lobster tail design, it has 7 wires in total. The upper wires are set in at an angle in a fan shape, which give a round outline to your bustle and plenty of strength to support your heaviest skirts. Ending a little above the knee, this bustle folds up easily to make sitting in any chair effortless. This bustle has side panels that wrap around the body to the front, which holds the bustle perfectly in place, and keeps it from shifting.

    This bustle comes in two sizes of prominence, Imperial and Regular. The Regular size is similar to the TV101/TV108 bustles. The Imperial size is quite a bit larger, and is perfect for 1887-88 impressions. The Imperial bustle may require length adjustments to our existing skirt patterns, which are discussed in the instructions.

    In the photos:  The Black bustle is Regular size, and the green stripe bustle is Imperial size.

    This pattern is now available for download!  Go to E-pattern listing.

    • $13.00

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
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    This pattern contains instructions for four different petticoats, suitable for the years 1870-1897. Historically accurate, these petticoats are perfect to help hold the silhouettes required for each individual era. The front is fitted with darts at the waist to help eliminate bulk. The closure is in the center back with a drawstring, for all views. The middle flounce has optional tucks to help stiffen the petticoat.

    View 1
    1870-1876 - Early bustle.
    This version is a full flounced petticoat with extra length in the back to fit over a bustle.

    View 2
    1877-1882 - Natural Form.
    This version has a slim front and does not fit over a bustle. Suitable for under Tie-Back style skirts. Also works well for 1890-1891 slim skirts.

    View 3
    1883-1889 - Late Bustle.
    This petticoat has the slim front needed for this era, plus has a full back with extra length to fit over a bustle.

    View 4
    1890-1897 - Bell Epoch.
    This skirt has the full front needed to hold the wide skirts fashionable during this period. Does not fit over a bustle.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $13.50

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    1
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    This skirt is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1880's. It can be made flat in back, to be worn with an either with an overskirt or polonaise, or with the back bouffant and the front decorated. The skirt is flat in front with gathers or pleats in back, with the extra fullness shifted to the back. It has the three front gores and full width in back that were popular at that time. The placket is in the left side back seam. An optional 6" ruffle can be added to the hem.

    This skirt is suitable for just about everything during the period of 1883-1889. It can be left plain for day wear, or elaborately trimmed for evening. Mix and match overskirts for different looks. This pattern also can be used for petticoats.

    REVISED EDITION - Now comes in larger sizing, and with more sizing options. Also, the ruffle has been reduced to the narrow ruffle that was popular during the Late Bustle period.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $14.50

    Score: 4.67 (votes: 3)
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    This skirt is particularlly suited to the years 1887-1888, and to fit over the TV163 - Imperial Tournure bustle.   It has three train options:


    View A is floor length all around, and is perfect as the base skirt for walking dresses.  It has a wide front gore, and narrow side gore which extends back over the bustle to give a narrow, but extended look to the back of the dress.  The full back panel has a bournous pleat at the center, which aslo acts as the closure.


    View B has a moderate length train, suitable for evening gowns.  The front is the same as for view A.  It also has gores added to the side back seams to help the train fall smoothly to the floor.  The extra wide back has the closure between the center back and side back panels.


    View C is a full court train, suitable for weddings or other formal events.  The front and sides are the same as for view B, with the back being a double width square train.  The back has two bournous pleats and a center back closure.

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    This Riding skirt, also known as a habit train, was worn while riding sidesaddle. It was drafted based on a tailoring guide from 1883, and is historically correct for 1880-1885. It is shorter on the left hand side, longer on the right hand side, and shaped to fit over the right knee. When in the saddle, the hem should hang level front to back. For walking, the right knee has a loop which attaches to a button at the center back. When looped up the skirt becomes floor length all around, and drapes prettily on the right hip.

    Recommended fabrics include wool, linen, twill, heavy broadcloth and similar fabrics. Colors were blue, green, black, brown, gray, beige, and tan. A riding habit in the 1880's was very severe in style, with no trimmings. Combine with TV464 for a very nice tailored looking habit, or any other bodice of the same fabric.

    ** Safety Warning**
    Historical riding skirts can be dangerous for modern sidesaddle riding. In the event of a fall, the skirts may become entwined onto the saddle, leaving the rider dangling helplessly from the saddle. Most riding organizations require the use of a safety skirt for show ring purposes. This skirt is not a safety skirt, nor is it considered an official riding outfit. This pattern is intended for costume purposes only.

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    This skirt is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1880's. It is lightly draped in the front, with the back bouffant. All of the draping is created with pleats off the waistband, with no pleats in the side seams. This style of draping was very popular toward the end of the bustle era. This skirt is perfect for a day dress as full length, made out of heavier materials. Or, make the skirt out of lighter stuffs, and pull the hem higher by bunching the skirt on the sides, to create an overskirt for fancier dress.

    This pattern requires 60" material. If using 45", you will need to piece the panels together. It is also recommended that you use underskirt TV261 as a base under this skirt to help hold the form of your skirt. This skirt fits over petticoat bustle TV101.

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    The Butterfly detachable train is a separate garment that attaches to any existing skirt, forming a bow or "butterfly" at the back of the bodice and then falling gracefully to the floor in poufs. This train was very popular in 1883-1887. It is perfect for a wedding gown, or turning a floor length dress into an evening showpiece. The large poufs at the back are created with pleats at the center back. These pleats are then placed over the lower edge of a long waisted bodice and hooked in place on the bodice itself. Additional pleats at the sides help create the butterfly effect. This train is very authentic, elegant, and easy to make.

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    This overskirt design is seen in a Butterick Catalog in 1884. A very similar skirt was also found in an 1882 catalog, worn without a bustle. The design of this overskirt allows the swags and poufs to be let out flat, to allow for washing and ironing. This ability lends the name of "wash" dress, and is therefore usually made of cotton or other washable fabrics. But the elegant drapings are also suitable for fine dress fabrics as well. As given here, it is designed to be worn with an underskirt and bustle petticoat TV101.

    The pointed front apron is attached to the sides, the edges form casings for tie strings which lift the sides and apron, giving a beautiful swag and rear puffs. The sides split at the center front and continue to the back without a seam, having a center back seam and closure. Can be made from a single fabric or of two fabrics, for a beautiful layered look.

    • $14.50

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
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    This skirt is drafted based on an actual garment as seen in an 1887 fashion magazine. It is designed to be worn with a four-gore underskirt and petticoat TV101. The front hangs in long drapes just overlapping in the center front and pulled high up onto the hips. The back is long and bouffant, with the sides falling in folds to make a nice uneven hem line. The closure is in the center front.

    This pattern works best with non-bulky fabrics, and makes a very nice summer outfit.

    • $15.00

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    The Autumn Overskirt design is seen in several fashion plates from the early 1880's, until about 1887. It was very popular during the transitional period of 1884 -1886, when the bustle was reintroduced after a period of unsupported skirts. It is designed to be worn with an underskirt and bustle petticoat TV101.

    The long, gored front apron is heavily swaged with pleats high at the side back, which disappear under the back drapery. It can be either pointed or rounded, in both front and back. The back has drooping poufs framed at the sides by a rippled "fall" on each side. The closure is in the center back.

    This pattern may not be suitable for stripes.

    • $15.25

    Score: 4.00 (votes: 1)
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    The August overskirt design is seen in several fashion plates from the early 1880's, including our logo. It was very popular during the transitional period of 1882 -1884, when the bustle was reintroduced after a period of unsupported skirts. It is designed to be worn with an underskirt and bustle petticoat TV101. It can be worn for any of the bustle era's, including Natural Form.

    The front gored apron is heavily swaged with pleats at the side seams. The back has large poufs which are held in place by tapes, with the hem draped up to give the back an oval appearance. The button closure is in the left side seam.

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    This overskirt is drafted based on an actual garment as seen in the October 26, 1887 edition of La Mode Illustre. The front apron is a long swag, pulled up high onto the hips in large pleats that fan beautifully. A slit in the center front hem forms 2 points. The back is in two pieces, and falls in graceful cascades down the center back forming two points. The cascade is achieved through creative pleating, highlighted by 2 burnous pleats. The closure is in the center back. The apron is cut on the cross grain.

    This overskirt is ideal for lengthwise stripes, which would then go across on the front, and downward in the back. Any light to medium weight fabric will be suitable, however.

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    This skirt is drafted based on an actual garment as seen in a fashion book of the 1880's. The front apron is a long swag, pulled up high onto the hips in large pleats. The back is in waterfall style (falls down the back in long, straight pleats) with the tail ends hanging in three points. The closure is in the left side. The apron is cut on the cross grain.

    This skirt is ideal for lengthwise stripes, which would then go across on the front, and downward in the back. Any fabric will be suitable, however.

    • $14.75

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