Belle Epoch Patterns - 1890's

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    ** This pattern is an updated version of the discontinued TV121 petticoat pattern.**
    The detachable train has been redesigned to work better and to fit under the TV225 Fantail Skirt.

    This petticoat  is designed to give support behind the knees for tied-back or Natural Form style skirts of 1877-1882.  It is slim in front, and lightly gathered to the waistband at the front and sides.  The back has a pillowed section of gathered rows of netting which hold out the full back.  The closure is in the center front seam.  Two 6" ruffles are added to the hem all around.  The detachable train buttons onto the back of the petticoat just below knee height, and down the side back seams.  Matching rows of ruffles follow the hem of the train. 

    The petticoat by itself is perfect for under floor length, Natural Form skirt, like TV221 - 1877 Tie-back Skirt.  Add the train, and it supports TV225 - 1878 Fantail Skirt beautifuly.  This petticoat is also great for wear under 1890-91 skirt that need slimness in front and fullness behind.

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    This pattern contains instructions for four different petticoats, suitable for the years 1870-1897. Historically accurate, these petticoats are perfect to help hold the silhouettes required for each individual era. The front is fitted with darts at the waist to help eliminate bulk. The closure is in the center back with a drawstring, for all views. The middle flounce has optional tucks to help stiffen the petticoat.

    View 1
    1870-1876 - Early bustle.
    This version is a full flounced petticoat with extra length in the back to fit over a bustle.

    View 2
    1877-1882 - Natural Form.
    This version has a slim front and does not fit over a bustle. Suitable for under Tie-Back style skirts. Also works well for 1890-1891 slim skirts.

    View 3
    1883-1889 - Late Bustle.
    This petticoat has the slim front needed for this era, plus has a full back with extra length to fit over a bustle.

    View 4
    1890-1897 - Bell Epoch.
    This skirt has the full front needed to hold the wide skirts fashionable during this period. Does not fit over a bustle.

    This pattern is now available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $13.50

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
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    This skirt is the classic can-can skirt of the 1890's. Calf length, it is a full circle skirt, with a lining loaded with ruffles. Center back closure. This skirt is suitable for dance hall and saloon wear.

    The Can-can was a stage act that originated in Paris in the 1840's, at the more questionable entertainment establishments. It was a dance in which girls would swing up their skirts to show their ankles, petticoats, drawers, and stockings, offering quick glimpses designed to tease the typically male audience. A rare sight indeed, as showing anything above the ankle was taboo. By the 1870's this dance entertainment was gaining popularity at the more respectable establishments as well, and was quickly becoming socially acceptable, though still considered risqué. Needless to say, as this was a seedier stage costume, there is very little source material for the early years. By the 1890's the skirt had taken on the circular shape and layered ruffles on the underside to give a flashy and elegant style to the dance. Historically, the skirt was worn with a regular bodice, high at the back of the neck, low at the bosom, and 3/4 length sleeve. The ruffles on the underside were typically white, to simulate the layers of petticoats. For modern interpretations, the skirt is often worn with a chemise and corset, or a ball gown bodice, and the ruffles are brightly colored.

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    This skirt pattern is taken from an original Metropolitan Pattern Co. pattern of 1898. It consists of 7 gores, with gathers at the center back. It is moderately full and has hem facings for added support. The closure is at the center back . This shape is suitable as a basic walking skirt from 1892-1900.

    This pattern is now also available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    This skirt is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1890's. It has a nice full A-line in the front, with the back very full and trained. It has a fitted front piece and the sides are fitted with darts. The back has a crossways seam, piecing 45" wide material to make the train. This style of skirt was extremely popular from 1892-1895, and can be used for both day and evening wear. Several Worth gowns are based on this style.

    This skirt will look beautiful in stripes, as well as solid fabrics. For best results, wear with a large petticoat to help hold the shape of the skirt.

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    This skirt is drafted based on a tailoring method used in the 1890's. The front is slim and hangs in light swags coming from the waist at the side back. The back is cut in fan style, falling in a double pleat in the center back. The closure is in the left side-back seam, hidden inside the pleat. This skirt works well if worn with Petticoat TV121, to help hold the proper shape.

    This pattern is cut on both the cross grain and with the grain, and may not be suitable for stripes or directional prints. This pattern requires a minimum of 50" wide material. For a length of greater than 41", material of 54" wide, or greater, will be required. An option would be to add a false hem to the bottom of the skirt.

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    This skirt is drafted based on an original pattern from an 1895 Harper's Bazar Magazine supplement. The very full skirt has a gore in front, and very wide gores on each side. The sides fall smoothly from the waist into four folds at the hem. The back is made up of three godets, each forming a large fold. The folds are held in place by a tape on the inside. The placket is in the left side back seam. The opening is hidden under the left back godet.

    The skirt measures a full six yards around at the hem. This is the widest skirt I have seen for this period. It should be worn over several petticoats to give the proper wide effect. Combine this skirt with huge sleeves, and you have a classic 1890's look.

    • $17.00

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
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    This skirt is drafted based on a drafting method taken from a turn-of-the-century tailoring guide. The front panel extends the full length of the skirt, while the sides and back are cut with a fitted upper section and a tapered flare to add fullness at the hem. It has box pleats on either side of the center back closure. An optional kick pleat can be added to the front seams at the hem. This style of skirt was extremely popular from 1898-1903, and can be used for both day and evening wear.

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    This skirt is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1890's. It is very slim in the front, with the back very full and trained. It is cut all in one piece, with a center back seam and darts across the front. This style of skirt was extremely popular from 1890-1893, and can be used for both day and evening wear. Several Worth gowns are based on this style.

    If you need a skirt longer than 40" front length, you will need to have material wider than 45". Also, this pattern is cut on the cross grain and may not be suitable for some stripes or prints. This pattern has three length options; wedding, evening, and floor length.

    • $15.00

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
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    This pattern for a split skirt is taken from a tailoring guide of 1901. The Split Riding Skirt is ankle length, and the Bicycle Skirt is calf length. The center front has buttons to close the split. The center back has double box pleats to hide the split legs. There are two side front plackets with flaps for the closure.

    This skirt is suitable for riding, hiking, bicycling, hunting, and other sporting outfits.

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    This bodice has a low round neck perfect for evening events. The waist is extended for the late 1880s-early 1890s style. The sleeves are a pouf gathered into the middle for a stylish effect. The bodice can also be left sleeveless. This closure is in the center back, either buttons or hook and eyes.

    The bodice is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the late Victorian era. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the bodice seams true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, without a bustle.

    • $12.75

    Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
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    This is a basic gathered Blouse Waist, which was popular in 1893. It has a gathered front and back, with a fitted lining. The center front is cut on the straight of grain, for use with plaids and stripes. The sleeve is the Balloon Sleeve, popular in 1893-94, and has a fitted lining. The Jabot is removable. The gathered blouse waist style was popular from the 1880s, and with a different sleeve, can easily be adapted to the late bustle era. Or, left sleeveless, it can be used effectively as a "vest" for wear under jackets for an 1880-1900 look.

    The blouse is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1890's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled. All of the blouse seams are true to the era, and it is designed to fit over a corset.

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    Our Corselet is designed to be worn on the outside, similar to a wide belt, and shaped to fit snug to the body. This pattern contains two corselets, one tall and one short. Both extend below the waist a few inches and have points in front and back. They both lace at the center back. The short corset is 4" wide at the side and 8" center front and back. The tall corset is 6" wide at the sides and 9 1/2" at the front and back. Fully boned, this corselet will retain the perfect shape through extended wear. They can fit with or without a bustle.

    The corselets are perfect for wear with a blouse, to keep the trim waistline. They were very popular in the 1890's, but also are seen in the 1880's. Wear under an Eton Jacket for a very fashionable look.

    This pattern is now also avialable as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

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    This is a basic fitted bodice for the mid 1890's. Short over the side hip, it has a short point at center front and center back. It has a center front hook/eye closure, military collar, and fitted sleeves with 2 puff variations. It also has an optional brettelle, wide over the shoulder, and tapering at the center front and center back.

    This pattern is very pretty made up as is, or can be used as a base to add more elaborate trimmings. The sleeve puffs are suitable for sleeves of 1893-1897, and without the puffs can suit 1890-93 or 1897-99.

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    A shirtwaist is the original name for what we would call a blouse today.  They are usually for summer wear, and are unlined and unboned and come in a vast array of styles.    They can be made of any light weight fabric.   Shirtwaists start to become popular in the early 1890s and become even more so throughout the next few decades, and are a staple for the working woman and the fashionable woman alike.   It can be worn tucked into the skirt, or over the skirt, as desired.


    For our shirtwaists, the center front is cut on the straight of grain, and is closed with buttons.   The sleeve is the Large Mutton Sleeve popular in 1893-94.   The collar is a stand-and fall that looks particularly nice with a four-in-hand tie, similar to the men's ties of the period.  The body portion is gathered to fit a waistband, with a peplum attached to the same waistband.  The peplum can be omitted, if desired, to create a Spencer Waist.  View A, has a plain front, and View B has a front yoke with gathers at the center portion of the yoke.

    For this pattern, please disregard any attempt at standard sizing.  Everyone is unique in body type and size, and we have come up with a totally different way of managing patterns.  We have included comprehensive directions on how to size and adjust this pattern for a good fit.  Although we can't fit everyone, we have tried to do some of the guess work for you.  These methods are a little different than what you may be used to, so please read them carefully, before cutting out pattern pieces.  It is strongly advisable to make a mockup of the blouse, before cutting out your fashion fabric, to check fit.rawn, not scaled. All of the bodice seams are true to the era, and it is designed to fit snugly over a corset.

    This pattern is now also available as an E-Pattern.  Go to E-Pattern listing.

    • $13.50

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