Late Bustle 1883-1889

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, or that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    This is a chemise and drawers combined into one garment. This style of underwear first appeared in 1876, and was very popular due the reduction in bulk at the waist of a more fitted type of undergarment. Very comfortable to wear and versatile, this underwear is indispensable for the reenactor of all periods. With 3 different necklines, this garment can be used under virtually any dress, both day and evening styles. The crotch seam is left open and is finished with facings. The legs are finished with a simple band below the knee. The center front closes with buttons.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper or at a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    This corset pattern is taken from an original pattern found in the May 31, 1886 issue of De Gracieuce, a Dutch magazine similar to Harpers Bazzar. It was published in several other magazines of the time as well, including La Mode Illustre and Harpers Bazzar. This pattern has been modified slightly to accommodate the different cup sizes and modern body types, but retains most of the original proportions and elegance of the original garment.

    This corset has 6 panels, a center front busk, and laces in the center back.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, or that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos.  

    In a search for a bigger, better bustle we have come up with the Imperial Tournure. Tournure is the French term for bustle. Based on the lobster tail design, it has 7 wires in total. The upper wires are set in at an angle in a fan shape, which give a round outline to your bustle and plenty of strength to support your heaviest skirts. Ending a little above the knee, this bustle folds up easily to make sitting in any chair effortless. This bustle has side panels that wrap around the body to the front, which holds the bustle perfectly in place, and keeps it from shifting.

    This bustle comes in two sizes of prominence, Imperial and Regular. The Regular size is similar to the TV101/TV108 bustles. The Imperial size is quite a bit larger, and is perfect for 1887-88 impressions. The Imperial bustle may require length adjustments to our existing skirt patterns, which are discussed in the instructions.

    In the photos:  The Black bustle is Regular size, and the green stripe bustle is Imperial size.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper or at a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    This pattern contains instructions for four different petticoats, suitable for the years 1870-1897. Historically accurate, these petticoats are perfect to help hold the silhouettes required for each individual era. The front is fitted with darts at the waist to help eliminate bulk. The closure is in the center back with a drawstring, for all views. The middle flounce has optional tucks to help stiffen the petticoat.

    View 1
    1870-1876 - Early bustle.
    This version is a full flounced petticoat with extra length in the back to fit over a bustle.

    View 2
    1877-1882 - Natural Form.
    This version has a slim front and does not fit over a bustle. Suitable for under Tie-Back style skirts. Also works well for 1890-1891 slim skirts.

    View 3
    1883-1889 - Late Bustle.
    This petticoat has the slim front needed for this era, plus has a full back with extra length to fit over a bustle.

    View 4
    1890-1897 - Bell Epoch.
    This skirt has the full front needed to hold the wide skirts fashionable during this period. Does not fit over a bustle.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper or at a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    This skirt is drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1880's. It can be made flat in back, to be worn with an either with an overskirt or polonaise, or with the back bouffant and the front decorated. The skirt is flat in front with gathers or pleats in back, with the extra fullness shifted to the back. It has the three front gores and full width in back that were popular at that time. The placket is in the left side back seam. An optional 6" ruffle can be added to the hem.

    This skirt is suitable for just about everything during the period of 1883-1889. It can be left plain for day wear, or elaborately trimmed for evening. Mix and match overskirts for different looks. This pattern also can be used for petticoats.

    REVISED EDITION - Now comes in larger sizing, and with more sizing options. Also, the ruffle has been reduced to the narrow ruffle that was popular during the Late Bustle period.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper or at a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    This overskirt design is seen in a Butterick Catalog in 1884. A very similar skirt was also found in an 1882 catalog, worn without a bustle. The design of this overskirt allows the swags and poufs to be let out flat, to allow for washing and ironing. This ability lends the name of "wash" dress, and is therefore usually made of cotton or other washable fabrics. But the elegant drapings are also suitable for fine dress fabrics as well. As given here, it is designed to be worn with an underskirt and bustle petticoat TV101.

    The pointed front apron is attached to the sides, the edges form casings for tie strings which lift the sides and apron, giving a beautiful swag and rear puffs. The sides split at the center front and continue to the back without a seam, having a center back seam and closure. Can be made from a single fabric or of two fabrics, for a beautiful layered look.

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  • TV365E - 1883 August Overskirt E-Pattern
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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, or that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    The August overskirt design is seen in several fashion plates from the early 1880's, including our logo. It was very popular during the transitional period of 1882 -1884, when the bustle was reintroduced after a period of unsupported skirts. It is designed to be worn with an underskirt and bustle petticoat TV101. It can be worn for any of the bustle era's, including Natural Form.

    The front gored apron is heavily swaged with pleats at the side seams. The back has large poufs which are held in place by tapes, with the hem draped up to give the back an oval appearance. The button closure is in the left side seam.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, or that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos. 

    This bodice is designed after a style shown in an 1883 Haper's Bazar magazine. This style was also popular in the later 1880's and 1890's, as well. The front of this bodice has a point and the sides extend past the waist. The back and side-back have "tails" that lay in double box pleats, giving the classic "waterfall" style, in either a long or short version. The sleeve is in 2 pieces, and can be made either full- or 3/4-length. There is a full mandarin collar for the high neck, a mandarin collar for the keyhole neckline, and a half collar for the open neck variation.

    Our bodices are drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1880's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the seams true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, and over a bustle.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, or that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos. 

    The Alexandra bodice is designed after an illustration from the April 1889 issue of The Delineator magazine.  Similar styles can be found throughout the late 1880's, which makes this bodice suitable for the years 1885 - 1889.  The front of this bodice has a  narrow, simulated vest, which buttons down the center front. A shawl collar edges the front bodice at the vest seam giving a nice lapel look. The front hemline is pointed  and the sides curve upward over the hip.  The center back has cascade pleats below the waist, and the side backs frame the pleats with a point on each side, allowing the bodice to fit over either a modest bustle, or the large imperial bustle of the late 1880's.  The sleeve is in 2 pieces, and can be made either full, or ¾-length.  A cuff can be added to the full length sleeve.  The standing collar has turned down points at the center front and can be made of the same fabric as the vest.

    Our bodices are drafted based on a tailoring method actually used in the 1880's. Each size is hand drawn, not scaled, with all of the seams true to the era. This bodice is designed to fit snugly over a corset, and over a moderate sized bustle.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos.

    This is a pattern for a buckram hat frame, to be covered with fabric. It has a tapered crown, and narrow brim. It perches lightly on top of the head, slightly forward, and held in place with hat pins.

    Four crown heights allow for a wide variety of styles. Made with millinery wire, the hat is very durable and holds a good shape. We provide directions for one method of covering the frame during making up. There are many ways to cover a hat frame, however. Feel free to experiment with fabrics and folds to get a really professional look.

    The Short crown is suitable for 1870-1884.
    The Regular crown is suitable for 1883-1885.
    The Tall crown is perfect for 1884-1889.
    The X-Tall crown is for 1886-1888.

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    This is a downloadable pattern that you can print at home, on your standard printer with Letter/A4 size paper, or that you can have printed by a professional printer, like Kinkos. 

    This is a pattern for a buckram hat/bonnet frame, that needs to be covered with fabric. It has a tapered crown, in regular and tall height. The crown can be either with a peak in the front, or turned up, in regular width, or in wide width. It perches lightly on top of the head, slightly back, and is held in place with hat pins, or bonnet sashes.

    Made with millinery wire, the hat is very durable and holds a good shape. We provide directions for one method of covering the frame during making up. There are many ways to cover a hat frame, however. Feel free to experiment with fabrics and folds to get a really professional look.

    The Regular crown is suitable for 1875-1889.
    The Tall crown is perfect for 1884-1889.

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    This pattern contains the basic patterns for parasols with 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10 ribs, with ribs lengths from 9" to 26".   Also included is a pattern for a tip scrunchy that will give a nice finish to the area where the cover meets the tip of the parasol handle.

    Parasols were an integral part of life for a Victorian Era lady.   Not only were they functional in protecting a lady from the harmful rays of the sun, they were also a decorative accessory to her outdoor costume.  They could be of a serviceable plain linen, or a fancy bright silk with ruffles, or an heirloom masterpiece of lace and ribbons.  Unfortunately, most of the parasols surviving today have the fabrics in tatters.   But the good new is that the finely crafted handles and folding mechanisms are usually still in good condition, and are waiting for someone to come along and recover them, restoring them to new glory.

    Recovering an old parasol is not that difficult, and can be a lot of fun.  The first step is to find an antique parasol handle that is still in good condition, aside from the fabric cover.  The cover can be shredded or even missing, but the skeleton of the parasol should be in good working order, and the ribs straight.  (Minor bends that can easily be re-straightened are fine.)  Check your local antique stores, Ebay, and other sites that carry antiques and collectibles, and you will be amazed at what you can find.  If you are unable to find an antique handle, you can also purchase a new parasol with a suitable handle, and replace the cover to something more suiting to your taste.  Sometimes, you can also create a fancier and longer handle by adding spindles and finials to an existing handle.  

     

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