dress 19, week of December 1, 2004

Every week, with will post photos of a specific dress and discuss the various aspects on how the dress was built. A dress dissection, if you will.
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dress 19, week of December 1, 2004

Postby Heather » Wed Dec 01, 2004 11:09 am

Image
tinman815
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Postby tinman815 » Wed Dec 01, 2004 12:12 pm

YAY first one!! :D this one's easy. It's a evening dress for sure! Early bustle period, 1875. Fabrics: I say silk or satin. I can't think of a color, but are those grapes on the drape?! Dust ruffle on bottom of train to keep dust away from train. TV216, with large drape in front, TV416, and TV301, just make the drape bigger.
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Postby diana » Wed Dec 01, 2004 3:45 pm

This looks just like the 1875 Parisian train. So I'll say 1875 ballgown.
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Postby Greeneyed Gypsy » Wed Dec 01, 2004 11:01 pm

OK if they are grapes ...lets call the gown a pale green ...or lavender...parisian ...sure I'll go 1875...or even a smidge earlier. silk taffeta.
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Postby ashamanja babu » Thu Dec 02, 2004 9:53 am

I'll say 1873. Ball dress, silk with lace ruffles. The bodice looks cut in one with the overskirt. The way the figure is drawn (rounded arms, fuller abdomen, etc) suggest an earlier date to me. (Is it cheating to go by factors other than the dress itself?)

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Postby Greeneyed Gypsy » Thu Dec 02, 2004 4:14 pm

nope...guess anyway you like! We had a very nice discussion about a hiking pole/javilin one week!
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Postby ashamanja babu » Fri Dec 03, 2004 7:35 am

oh yeah, the javelin :lol: . that was very strange.

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Postby m d b » Sat Dec 04, 2004 4:58 am

This looks extremely familiar.. like from Die Mode.. so it's from a periodical I'm familiar with... Mode Artistique could it be from? Or possibly reprinted in another periodical, as happened with their plates.

With the wide neckline and absence of real sleeves this is more likely to be a ball dress. That said there are two evening dresses in the Harper's Bazaar book that show this style of sleeve. Ooh is that a dance card on her wrist??? I can't tell from this size image unfortunately...

The high but not excessively high bustle lead me to believe it is getting very close to the natural form period...

The hair is rather full at the front, and piled high behind with some longer ringlets. I can see that shape from 73-76 in my Harpers Bazaar book.

The short gloves don't help much in narrowing the date further.

The bustle is rather too pronounced for a fashionable (probably French) woman of 76 though... even for 75.. so I'm alternating between 73 and 74.... It would help if I had more 74 images to work with...

With another book I'm leaning towards 74 for the sheer height of that hair! She's also leaning back, and the plates I'm seeing from 73 show a distint forward lean.

Faille seems a pretty popular choice of fabric for this find of gown. I'm thinking there would be two shades of matching colours too. The rushed piece to the side of the skirt looks a shade darker.

OK, after rummaging through some paper files, I'm seeing that side piece in mostly 1874 plates. Unfortunately I have very few notes for this particular year;)
The necklace also drops from the throat slightly, and the 73 plates show them closer to the neck.
If that is a dance card hanging from her wrist, I'm going with ball gown. It looks square enough to be a card... and it's the only thing i can think of that would hang for a ladies wrist in formal wear. Though it could be a clip for her fan? Or skirt? Not seen them though.

Faille would be a popular choice, though it could also be taffeta. Two shades of the same colour seem right, trimmed with wide.. lace. Possibly of a few types as there are some heavy floral shapes, but mostly at the edges of the lace. Especially at the bottom of the train. And of course the grapes and grape leaves. Heh, in one books it was suggested women wore real flowers on the ir dresses with artificial ones in their hair... late 70s I htink that was for. However I'd suspect these are fake. Wax and silk perhaps? No one wants squashed fruit on their gown do they?

It's cut en princesse at the front, and probably the back, at least for the upper section.

So princesse dress of 1874 in faille or taffeta in two shades of the same colour (though it's hard to say it thta's just different shading from a more glossy fabric down the side) trimmed in lace and sprays of artificial grapes and leaves,. Evening or Ball, if the thing of her wrist is for one of the above, it's likely to be for a ball, as you don't really need it for a dinner or other evening acitivities.
[url=http://www.arrayedindreams.com]arrayedindreams.com[/url]
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Postby cathyo » Sun Dec 05, 2004 4:15 pm

1. The date of the dress, to a specific year:

I was originally inclined to say 1875, because the "bustle" seemed too small to be Early Bustle style but was definitely still present (so this is not a "Natural form" style. However, now I'm sure it's 1875, because the TV "History of Victorian Costume" page shows this exact picture on the "Early Bustle" page and identifies it as a "1875 ballgown". :-)

http://trulyvictorian.netfirms.com/1869.html

2. Type of dress, for example: day, evening, ballbown, reception, etc.

A ballgown. The bare arms and low neck both point to this, even without looking at the history page above.

3. The reasons for your choices, in detail.

See above.


4. Any construction ideas you may have to make the dress yourself, including patterns, trimmings, and correct support garments.


You'd want a corset, and something like the TV108 Grand Bustle as underpinnings (along with the usual chemise and petticoat). I would make this gown out of a substantial silk taffeta, in a medium pink, blue, or even apple green, with plenty of lace ruffles and self ruffles. I'd use TV216 without back poufs for the skirt, and TV416 (without sleeves, and with a sllightly lowered neckline) for the bodice.
--Cathy Raymond <cathy@thyrsus.com>
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Postby Miss Elisabeth » Wed Dec 08, 2004 3:29 pm

I'm saying 1878. It's definately a ballgown.

Elizabeth :)
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Postby Heather » Sun Dec 12, 2004 11:23 am

This is a Ball Toilette from the January 16, 1875 Issue of Harper's Bazar.

Full desription:

Skirt of straw-colored faille, partially veilled by Donna Maria gauze of the same color. The train, or ong court mantle, is trimmed on the bottom with a deep puffng of crepe, which forms the heading of a flounce of fine blonde lace with satin figures. On each side two quilles, formed of puffings of faillveiled with lace, and widening toward the bottom, separate the two parts of the skirt; thses quilles are edges with narrow blonde of the same kind as that of the flounce, but much narrower. The front is trimmed with wide blonode, surmounted by puffings of crepe edged with narrow blonde, and set on in curves to follow the outline of the princess tunic, the lace of which falls to the edge of the puffing, and is surmounted by a wreath of purple grapes and leaves. The tunic is short on the hips, and trails over the train of the skirt. The close-fitting Cuirass waist is laced under the arms, and simply trimed with a bertha of flowers on a foundation of lace. Amethyst necklace, medallion, and bracelets. hair dressed rather high, with a cluster of purple grapes and leaves, limke those of the dress.

What makes this an 1875 dress?

This off-the -shoulder bodice, train, and bustle make this an early buste gown, 1870-1876. The slim skirt font is 1873 and later, as is the long tunic bodice. The long front and short back of the bodice was very poular in 1874. The train is not yet pulled in behind the bustle as was popular in 1875 and later. This being an early 1875 dress, it stil has the elements of the year before.

Construction ideas:

What really caught my attention in this description, was the closure under the arms. That is very unusual for this early a dress. It must lace on both sides to keep the closures above the hips and unseen under the arms. I am not sure why this was important in this dress, as a center back closure would have been fine.

I would use TV208 for the skirt, and decorate the sections as described. The bodice could be TV416, with the hem extended in the fornt and sides. Remove the center front closure by taking 1/2" off the center front. Then leave the side seam open to 3" below the waist on both sides and make a laced closure. Or lace the center back.

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