Corded Petticoat

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Rebecca
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Corded Petticoat

Postby Rebecca » Tue Dec 28, 2004 4:41 pm

So I've been shoveling snow this morning and dreaming about costumes while I do it so I've got another question. I've been looking at the Romantic era dress and wondering about the petticoats. I'm assuming you might need a corded petticoat so I did a search and found several different instructions but I was wondering if anyone had made one and what you'd recommend.
LydianMode
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Postby LydianMode » Tue Dec 28, 2004 5:40 pm

I too am looking for information about cording, although for the stiffening in a bustle.

http://demode.tweedlebop.com/crinoline.html has some information on cording a petticoat, as well as pictures of the finished product. Kendra does very nice work.
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Postby Heather » Tue Dec 28, 2004 5:59 pm

I have some friends who made a corded petticoat for the 1840's era. The one thing they found out was to start with a narrowinsh skirt, rather than a wider one. If the skirt is wide enough to fold in on itself, that just what it did, collapse in.

1830s used everything they could think of to make a wider skirt. Cprding, and reed was very popular, as well as horsehair.
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Postby m d b » Wed Dec 29, 2004 3:41 am

http://costume.dm.net/cordpett.html
Though this is for 16thC, the tips page does offer some relaly useful hints for what not to do and the recipe was from a 19th discussion anyway;)

http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/for ... -3978.html
Discussion there with some more hints from people who have made them...

http://www.elizabethstewartclarkandcomp ... .php?t=219
I think that is the thread mentioend in the above one...


http://www.corsetsandcrinolines.com/tim ... hp?dt=1850
There is a an original corded petticoat there, as well as some very short corded crinolines.

If you have Fashion put out by the Kyoto Fashion Institute you can also see a corded petticoat that shows how narrow the skirts can be, as Heather says too large and they fold in on themselves. Actually it happened;) For hooped skirts even;) There's a photo in Fashion and reality by Alison Gernsheim that shows a very large hooped skirt ripping at the front. Plate 61 The Duchess of Manchester, 1863.


I've been doing a bit of a search on crin. And it's just starting to all come together and make sense;)
[url=http://www.arrayedindreams.com]arrayedindreams.com[/url]
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Postby Carolann Schmitt » Wed Dec 29, 2004 4:51 pm

I’ve been doing some in-depth research on skirt-supporting petticoats for an upcoming lecture. Part of my research included studying ten original corded petticoats, as well as patent information, manufacturing records, and other primary sources.

A common misconception is that a corded petticoat should act like a steel crinoline: standing out from the body without any folds or ripples. All of my research indicates this was not the case. While they do provide much more fullness and support than an ordinary gathered or a flounced petticoat; even the most heavily corded petticoat is not strong enough to support the additional petticoats or the skirt worn over top it. I put each of the original petticoats on a mannequin and they all fell into a few soft folds; and this was without any petticoats or a skirt over top. The same thing happened with the one original crinoline petticoat I examined. This is one of the reasons that the new steel petticoats were so popular; they were much lighter, much stronger, and eliminated all but two or three petticoats.

The original petticoats I examined varied in circumference from 82” to 111.75”. The size of the cords varied from 1.5 mm tightly twisted linen cord to ¼” sisal rope. The number of rows of cording varied from 28 to 134. Two of the petticoats had the cording sewn into the fabric (like piping); the remainder had the cords woven into the fabric. With one exception (made from heavy linen), all of the petticoats were made from fabrics that were lightweight but still had substantial body.

I’ve taught several classes on making corded petticoats over the years using several different types of cording. The petticoats constructed with multiple rows of very fine cord sandwiched between two layers of fabric have provided much more support than those made with fewer rows of heavier cords sewn as piping. Corded petticoats are not difficult to make but they sure are labor intensive. :D
Carolann Schmitt
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Ladies & Gentlemen of the 1860s Conference, March 2-5, 2006
Rebecca
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Postby Rebecca » Thu Dec 30, 2004 11:34 am

Thank you so much for the info! The links were very interesting especially corset and crinolines. Who'd have thought that such narrow cording would have provided more support that wider cord. I'll have to put that on my list of to do projects. Carolann I wish you were closer to the west coast so I could go to your lecture and class! :cry:
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Postby clementine » Fri May 18, 2007 9:38 pm

I have a question for any of you who have made a corded pettie. I want to make one. I took the plunge and bought the cording. I have the fabric. I only have one problem. My sewing machine circa 1950s ONLY does zigzag stich. It will do wide to narrow but it wont do straight :roll: ...so should I use a wide zigzag or a narrow one? Or just zigzag over the cord to hold it down?
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Postby Heather » Fri May 18, 2007 10:12 pm

Your machine must be able to do a straight stitch. Unless it is broken, or a specialized industrial machine. All home machines start as a straight stitch machine, and then have special settings/gears to make them do zigzag. So I bet if you play around with the settings, you can find the right one.

But in case you can't, I would go with the narrowest setting. This will space your cords slightly, which may be a good thing.
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Postby clementine » Mon May 21, 2007 8:45 pm

Thanks Heather :D But I have tried EVERY setting on the darn machine, NONE of them is a straight stich. It's a Regency but I have been told it's not realy mutch diffrent,except decorating style, then a old Pennys or Sears machine,It's actuly quite pretty it's aqua with a lot of crome, think 50's caddys. It's a old workhorse of a machine, it works fine with that exception. :D I'll use the narrow zizgzag as you suggest.
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Postby Heather » Mon May 21, 2007 9:59 pm

Have you tried opening it up the top and looking inside at the gears. My mothers old machine had plastic gears you could drop in that would make the machine do fancy stitches. Maybe one was left in and forgotten?
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Postby clementine » Tue May 22, 2007 7:23 pm

Thanks for the idea. but all thats inside my case is the workings it has no discs , no plastic at all except the carying case top. I think it's just a odd ball machine.
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Postby Heather » Tue May 22, 2007 10:44 pm

Well, that got me curious so I looked up Regency sewing machines on the web. And I found absolutly nothing!!!

Well, there was one small clip. Apparently, there was a Japanese made Zig-Zag only sewing machine made for a short time. Go figure! :? :D
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Postby clementine » Fri May 25, 2007 2:46 pm

thanks for the info. Wouldnt you know it would be me that got the odd ball machine :confused: The darn thing works great, though, sews like a top. Best of all it was free,as a gift from a co.worker. Learn something new everyday :D .

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