Tightlace Silverado?

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Karolina
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Tightlace Silverado?

Postby Karolina » Thu Nov 25, 2004 1:42 am

I'm looking for the hourglas effect when making my Silverado corset. Have read though that Silverado more flattens the waist rather that reducing it. After reading Heathers extra page about making the corset, and also reading comments at that Great Patterns Review, it is clear that I must make the hip area larger. But how exactly do I do that? Hip gores? Are the necessary and how do I do them?
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Postby ashariel » Thu Nov 25, 2004 1:52 am

I always use a hip gore when making LM corsets, and my shapes are plenty hourglass. You would insert them the same way you'd insert bust gores (just on the bottom, of course!). I'm looking at my finished Silverado now, and the hip gores are placed between the fourth and fifth panels (counting from front to back). If you have your pattern notes, Joann has a little diagram of where the hip gore should go if used (at least mine did). Good luck!
--ashariel
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Postby Karolina » Thu Nov 25, 2004 5:02 am

What do I do with the boning if I insert hip gores? And where can I find Joanns diagram?

Thanks!
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Postby Heather » Thu Nov 25, 2004 8:37 am

Everyone always talks about inserting hip gores. That is just the hard way to do it if you ask me.

All you need to do is fade out to a larger pattern size at the hips. Expand only the side and back seams, as expanding the front will allow your belly to pouch. I personally, cut the waist as a size 16 and the hip as a size 22. I have a very hourglass shape. This will give you pleanty of room in the hip. Fading in and out to the different size lines to conform to your body gives you the adjustablitly to fit any shape.
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Postby Karolina » Fri Nov 26, 2004 12:35 am

Thank you Heather. I had the feeling that you were going to say something like that so I haven't done anything yet. I guess there will be no problems with the boning this way either..

So.. in the end:
I'm a quite normal size 14. Should I cut a size 12 and make the hips 14 or maybe 16? I made my Simplicity in size 12 and that one fits good.
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Postby Heather » Fri Nov 26, 2004 9:15 am

Compairing patterns from different companies is apples and oranges. Everyone has thier own models, so they really have nothing to do with each other. You have to look at the size charts and compair your actual measurements to the charts. If you follow the sizing method outlined on my corset help page, you should get what you need,

When you say "normal 14" is that what you buy off the rack? or is that your pattern size when looking at Laughing moons size charts? Also, does that mean 14 bust, waist and hip, all of it? It is easier for me to help you if I know you actual measures. Then I can walk through the size charts, too.

A quick note on waist triaining, etc. If you don't have an hourglass figure, corseting will not get you one, without much suffering involved. If you try to force a shape you don't have, you will be fairly uncomfortable, and unable to wear your corest for long periods of time. Some larger people are very "squishy" and can relocate thier body deposits to other regions to acheive an hourglass shape. But thinner people can't. They have to torture themselves day and night for months/years to shift bones and organs to a new shape. Think Chinese foot binding. Fashionable Victorian ladies were corseted from the age of 1-2 years and wear formed by years of constriction and literaly "grown" into the classic hourglass shape.

So motto of the day, make the corset fit your shape, and not the shape fit your corset. Then you will be able to enjoy your hours dressed up, and want to do it some more. The primary function of a corset is to firm your shape and hold the bustline in a pleasing location. Trimming down a waist is a secondary function, and unneccesary. Once you put your dress over the corset, all that matterns is firmness and fit. The skirts will add bulk to your hips, the bodice trims add shape or decor to your bust. A smooth line in between is all that is needed to look good.

And having said that, making the hip one size bigger can't ever really be a bad idea, so go for it. Unless you just don't have a shape that fills the extra hip space.
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Postby Dana » Fri Nov 26, 2004 12:12 pm

Heather, that was very well-said. I'm only half an hourglass which these days is called a pear. It wouldn't matter how much I contorted my rib bones and waist, etc. I ain't gettin' any bigger bust that way! I'm not real fleshy so I can't change my shape very well. Rather than torture myself the way women used to do in the way you described in your post I just "wadded" my corset in the bust to try to near the proportion of my hips. This keeps me comfortable during the day so that I can wear a corset for long periods without much suffering but alas, no low-cut evening dresses for me--no cleavage to fill them out! :oops:

Cutting the hip section larger on the corset is the way I would go too. Not hip gores. In fact, because of being a 'pear' I have to cut all my pattern pieces a size larger in the hip compared to the waist. It always works out great.
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Postby Karolina » Sun Nov 28, 2004 12:10 pm

I got something like an hourglass figure already, I just don't want the corset to flatten me out as I saw someone wrote. I measured myself now before dinner and I've got a 37,6 bust, 28,8 waist and 39 hips. I guess I should cut the pattern then in a bust: 14, waist: 14 and hips: 16.
But then you recommended that from size 14 and up, you should make the pattern one size smaller automatictly?

/Karolina
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Postby Heather » Sun Nov 28, 2004 1:32 pm

Sounds good. Cut one size smaller, so 12 bust, waist, and 14 hip should be good.
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Postby ashariel » Sun Nov 28, 2004 8:35 pm

I only insert the gores because I love the way they look (and I don't find them difficult to put in). :)
--ashariel
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Postby Karolina » Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:21 am

Ok! Now it is all clear to me, thank you! I can't wait to go home now!!
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Postby Dana » Mon Nov 29, 2004 10:16 am

Karolina wrote: I just don't want the corset to flatten me out
/Karolina


Since we on this board fall into different catagories of what our objectives are in the wearing of TV patterns this may not apply to you so take it for what it's worth--if you look at old photos of women from the Victorian years, or if you look at illustrations from say, Peterson's, Delineator, Harper's, etc., you notice that the bustline is not necessarily flattened but neither is it lifted high and out.

I don't know if you're going for an authentic true-to-period look or not but if so, it's just a detail to consider.
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Postby Karolina » Tue Nov 30, 2004 12:25 am

Hi Dana. Well it is/was the waist I'm concerned about. I read these lines at The Great Pattern review;

"After making the first version, I discovered that if you want any kin of waist reduction with this corset, you really need to add the hip gores. The pattern says they are optional but, I have an hourglass figure (natually) and, without the hip gores, the Silverado flattened everything out."

But after reading Heathers recommendations I don't think there will be any problems!
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Postby Dana » Tue Nov 30, 2004 10:53 am

Hi Karolina,

I get it now. Well, in that case, I'm reminded of Heather's point; the bustling will take care of the hip section for you, accentuating your waist.
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Postby Marie » Mon Jan 03, 2005 10:29 am

Just thought I'd add my two cents in to this, since I asked myself the same question when I set about making my first corset from the Dore/Silverado patterns. Since I have measurments of hip 43, waist 30, bust 41, uncorsetted, I just looked on the sheet and picked the closest size to each measurement, and then eased them into each other. My first attempt was way *way* too long waisted and so I shortened it in the front and re-adjusted the waist to fit me. I just had to make sure that I fixed mine from the front center seam to the back, and if I changed one thing on one side of my pieces, I did it immediately to the other side. Then, by the time you get to the back, you can just eyeball it and see if you want it to meet (as I've seen some prom dress corsets do) or have a small gap or have a wide gap for tighter lacing. I personally HATE gores, probably leftover from trying to get a simplicity corset pattern to work. The Dore is just a dream compared to those beasts. Anyway, hope this helps. :)
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Postby m d b » Mon Jan 03, 2005 11:02 pm

I'm a sort of pear shape.. well frankly it depends on how much weight I've put on;) I've got one of those figures that gets more curvy the more weight I lose (due to musculoskeletal shape.)

Though I found makign up the pattern for the 1880s corset exactly to scale from the Corsets and Crinolines book by Nora Waugh gives me a better shape than trying to make the pattern fit me.

Sort of like the hip issue but for the bust: make it to fit once the stress of lacing comes in the bust flattens. If I make the bust "too big" it gives me a better shape.

That said I do need to take out a tiny bit in the bust, just around the top edge.

I also have to shift the loops for lacing further down thanks to having a relaly long rib cage. It gives me very little area to constrict. I'm not a dainty flower, and do have a fair bit of adipose to distribute, just not around the lower torso to waist, but just below my natural waist. Which happens to drop anyway when the weight comes off.

Just as an example of how to adjust that may seem counter intuitive. It was to me at first: I'm high waisted, and my stays need to be low waisted because my natural waist is actually just above the bottom rib.

As for shape acheived in period... well it depends on how fashionable you want to be. I've seen beautifully fitted garments on women of all sizes, and I've seen badly fitted garments on women of all sizes. And women who were very straight up and down, women who achieved a curvy fit....

Padding was also an option, and there are some dresses still with the padding isnide... and there were other devices for padding out. Parodied quite niely in a French periodical of the late 1870s.
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