Latest Comments

melliemoo

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

melliemoo [Member]
Thank you, I think that makes sense. I'm making a non-TV skirt that has this type of pleat, and I think once I play with it then it will work out.
PermalinkPermalink 07/05/17 @ 11:44
Heather McNaughton

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

Melliemoo, The waistband holds the top edge in place where it is needed. But the section in between is not supported at all, and hangs down loosely however it chooses. The loop edges will usually stay together on it's own so you do not need to sew them together. Though you can if you wanted to, so that you would not have to hem or face this section.
PermalinkPermalink 07/02/17 @ 21:25
melliemoo

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

melliemoo [Member]
I have one question. When you bring B to B to form the pleat, how does it stay? Do you stitch perpendicular to the top edge to hold the edges together?
PermalinkPermalink 07/02/17 @ 18:22
bragltd

In response to: Working with the 1903 Trumpet Skirt - TVE21

bragltd [Member]
Omg, I never realised that. I thought the diamonds had something to do with waist and hip sizes🤓.Glad I asked.
Thank you so much for the answer, definitely a help haha!
And yes, I have one piece of A:)
PermalinkPermalink 12/07/16 @ 12:52
Heather McNaughton

In response to: Working with the 1903 Trumpet Skirt - TVE21

Hi Josselin,
When looking at your pattern, you will see the the pieces all have diamond shapes along the side seams. These are called "nocthes" in sewing parlance. These notches are grouped together and placed in such a way that the notch of one piece will match up with the similar notch on the piece it sews to. For example, piece A has 1 notch on the side seam, and sews to the side on B that also has one notch. The second seam on B has 2 notch, which match the 2 notches on piece C, Etc.

Which brings me to a second issue; Piece A should be cut on the fold along the center front edge. The straight edge is not cut, but placed on the fold of the fabric so that it make only 1 piece when opened out. So really, the front should have two curvy edges, without any straight edge at all.

PermalinkPermalink 12/07/16 @ 09:43
bragltd

In response to: Working with the 1903 Trumpet Skirt - TVE21

bragltd [Member]
Hi Heather,
Just started working with your patterns. Made the Princesa skirt and now working on the Trumpet skirt. One things that keeps bringing me in doubt is which sides of the patterns to sew against each other. I have been trying to work it out myself, but would like to know the correct way.
For example here A and B, which side of B has to go to A? The straight one or the curving one?

Kind regards and thank you so much for your work,
Josselin - a beginner;)
PermalinkPermalink 12/07/16 @ 08:22
Sara R.

In response to: The Batternburg Tablecloth Edwardian Blouse

Sara R. [Visitor]
I've had your photo on my Pinterest inspiration page for so long, and just recently finished my own Battenberg tablecloth shirtwaist. I'm going to debut it this weekend at a museum event!
PermalinkPermalink 05/13/16 @ 15:35
Heather McNaughton

In response to: The Empire Skirt

Cassidy,

This skirt has 10 panels. The center front and center back are not on a fold. There is a placket at the center back, hidden in the center back seam. The term habit back means a plain seam down the center back for a fitted skirt back; no pleats or gathers.
PermalinkPermalink 03/19/16 @ 12:37
Cassidy

In response to: The Empire Skirt

Cassidy [Visitor]
Hi I was just wondering how many panels is the skirt? Are the Cf and Cb cut on the fold? Does the habit back extend all the way down of is it just a slit that was finished like a placket at the top of the skirt? I would love to order this pattern but I just want something as close to my original design as possible. Im kinda short on time and I don't have the luxury to play around and manipulate the pattern until its exactly perfect
PermalinkPermalink 03/19/16 @ 06:01
Jacquelyn Estrada

In response to: The Batternburg Tablecloth Edwardian Blouse

Jacquelyn Estrada [Visitor]
This is simply brilliant! I have several of your wonderful Edwardian blouse patterns but, have been too terrified of sewing in the insertion lace to actually complete any of them. This is the perfect solution! And, the antique swap meet by my home always features tablecloth dealers. I'm going to go clean them out! Thanks so very much for posting this! I will soon have a beautiful collection of shirtwaists!
PermalinkPermalink 01/15/16 @ 16:31
Leiflynn Jeffery

In response to: The Batternburg Tablecloth Edwardian Blouse

Leiflynn Jeffery [Visitor]
Wow! This is totally gorgeous and you are truly inspiring. I have to add this to my wish list. Great job on the tutorial love this blog.
PermalinkPermalink 09/22/15 @ 14:22
Leiflynn Jeffery

In response to: October 1880 Short Costume

Leiflynn Jeffery [Visitor]
Ooh, this is gorgeous! I would love to make this one up for sure. Love the Delineator magazine and you for bring it to us. Thank you for your great work!
PermalinkPermalink 09/22/15 @ 13:29
Heather McNaughton

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

Katelyn, no I am sorry, I do not have a pattern for that skirt. But you could make something similar using the TV290 - 1889 Draped Skirt and changing the back panel to have a flat top edge, and attach it to the waistband in 3 burnouse pleats.
PermalinkPermalink 09/21/15 @ 09:13
Katelyn

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

Katelyn [Visitor]
Is there any way to get the pattern from the 1888 skirt from The Delineator? That photo is what drew me to this post. I'm sad there's no corresponding pattern.
PermalinkPermalink 09/21/15 @ 01:42
Heather McNaughton

In response to: The Blouse-Waist

Val, what part did you have trouble with; the neckline, the tucks, or the sleeves? Neckline and tucks should be pretty basic; the sleeves are a little more work.

The neckline is just cutting a small "V" neck, and then shaping the trim to match.
PermalinkPermalink 06/01/15 @ 13:08
Val LaBore

In response to: The Blouse-Waist

Val LaBore [Visitor]
I would so much like to make a blousewaist like the 1904 one with that neckline. I tried altering the pattern you have with no luck.
PermalinkPermalink 06/01/15 @ 12:34
Heather McNaughton

In response to: 1880 - Frebruary - No. 6725 and No. 6879

Kelly, I just love this one, also. And, I already have a pattern for it! You can use TV432 - Tea Gown pattern. The only change would be to lift up the sides of the dress, and wear it over an underskirt. It even has an option for hip level pleats, exactly as needed for this polonaise.
PermalinkPermalink 05/11/15 @ 00:28
Kelly

In response to: 1880 - Frebruary - No. 6725 and No. 6879

Kelly [Visitor]
Oh, I would love it if you did this polonaise pattern!
PermalinkPermalink 05/10/15 @ 22:41
Heather McNaughton

In response to: Making a lace chemisette

Megan, you are correct. I have this article in both the La Mode Illustre, and the Der Bazar magazines. I chose to use the name of La Mode Illustre, as it is more recognizable. Not very many people have heard of Der Bazar. However, the illustration was a better quality in the Der Bazar publication.
PermalinkPermalink 03/03/15 @ 17:26
Megan

In response to: Making a lace chemisette

Megan [Visitor]
At the risk of stating the obvious, the text on the picture is not French, it's German. It says "under chemisette for a square-cut bodice."
PermalinkPermalink 03/03/15 @ 17:18
Sophie Dawson

In response to: Making a lace chemisette

Sophie Dawson [Visitor]
I'm new to this historical sewing thing and doing a lot of looking and research. This makes so much sense for much of the Victorian era. Something on this order would fill in the low square neckline of various styles. Being the conservative era many women, I think, may have used something like this to achieve several things.
1. Fill in the neckline, covering the skin.
2. Kept them warmer during cooler months.
3. Allowed for variety by having multiple chemisettes which would alter the look of their limited wardrobe.

Now I can look at making some of the varied necklines of the bodices since I know what I can do for the filler.
Thank you.
PermalinkPermalink 11/25/14 @ 09:23
Sophie Dawson

In response to: Flat Lining with a Serger

Sophie Dawson [Visitor]
Love how well you did the tutorial. So very helpful. Hoping to make a 1870's bustle dress. Your site will be what I go to for help.
PermalinkPermalink 11/06/14 @ 12:37
neenu khanna

In response to: Making a lace chemisette

neenu khanna [Visitor]
love the way you have explained.actually looking for regular online tutorials on pattern making.Did enroll into colleges but found them lacking,could you help me with the basics and so on.
PermalinkPermalink 10/25/14 @ 09:31
Heather McNaughton

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

The bustle ends short so that it will not interfere with sitting down. You will be happier with a separate petticoat. But all things are possible, if you rally want to do something. I tend to put my petticoats on drawstrings, rather than waistbands, so they can sit one above the other, rather than stack over each other. Plus, I tend to change size a lot, and drawstrings adapt to whatever size I need.
PermalinkPermalink 09/02/14 @ 14:26
Marie-Jeanne

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

Marie-Jeanne [Visitor]
Oh, and could I attach ruffles straight away on to the tail, and make a skirt over the front? I know it's not historical, but I want to minimize the amount of waistbands.
PermalinkPermalink 09/02/14 @ 04:25
Marie-Jeanne

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

Marie-Jeanne [Visitor]
Me again :-) I had a look at the lobster tail pattern. Why is it not full length at the back?
PermalinkPermalink 09/02/14 @ 04:21
Marie-Jeanne

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

Marie-Jeanne [Visitor]
Me neither :-) I've never made a bustle dress before,and I have a lot of other work to do too. My day job, refurbishing the whole house, dogs, cats, horses and chickens to look after etc.
Because I'm on a tied budget, I'll get the fabric from second hand shops.I haven't found any fabric or haberdashery shops here in the West of Ireland, so most of the material has to come from the US and UK. Problem is, it takes around two week from the US, so that will leave me with only 4 weeks to make the dress.
No pressure :-)
First up is the corset. I bought a kit from the UK, that includes all I need, including fabric, and it arrived today. I also have a pattern for the lobster bustle. That will keep me going for the coming weeks. I'll keep you posted.
PermalinkPermalink 09/01/14 @ 10:30
Heather McNaughton

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

Marie-Jeanne

That sounds very nice. TV416 would be the bodice you want for an off-shoulder gown. And yes, you can use just the front of TV364. I think you have a good plan. I can' wait to see it!
PermalinkPermalink 09/01/14 @ 10:04
Marie-Jeanne

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

Marie-Jeanne [Visitor]
Thanks Heather,

I will order the TV170, and was thinking of TV416 as the bodice, and TV263 as the overskirt, but I will make a front addition to that one just like TV364 has, or would I be better off with the TV364 and make the back longer?

What I want to create is an evening gown with bare shoulders.
PermalinkPermalink 09/01/14 @ 08:27
Heather McNaughton

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

Marie-Jeanner, yes, the lobster bustle would be good, and a nice petticoat over that. The TV170 will work, though you might need to add extra length in the back.
PermalinkPermalink 08/31/14 @ 20:24
Marie-Jeanner

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

Marie-Jeanner [Visitor]
Hi,

What type of petticoat is under this type of skirt if I would like to create the look of picture nr. 4, the red dress. Is that the lobster tail bustle and then TV170?

Thanks.
PermalinkPermalink 08/31/14 @ 15:02
Kat

In response to: The Empire Skirt

Kat [Visitor]
Yay! I'm really looking forward to what you have planned!
PermalinkPermalink 07/21/14 @ 20:32
Heather McNaughton

In response to: The Empire Skirt

Kat, oooh, that is beautiful. Yes, I want to make more. I think the next patterns for the Edwardian line will be an Eton Jacket, then an 1907 blouse, and after than a long jacket.
PermalinkPermalink 07/16/14 @ 11:21
Kat

In response to: The Empire Skirt

Kat [Visitor]
This is just lovely! Are there any plans for a jacket for this era? This one has me going crazy: http://www.antique-gown.com/index.php/en/1900-1919/art-nouveau-gala-or-evening-gown-with-coat,-ca-1909.html
PermalinkPermalink 07/16/14 @ 09:32
lorri larr

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

lorri larr [Visitor]
Hi my name is lorri. I was wondering, do you give sewing classes or lessons?
PermalinkPermalink 06/14/14 @ 16:08
Diane Ullman

In response to: Flat Lining with a Serger

Diane Ullman [Visitor]
I have discovered that this technique works nearly as well on your sewing machine if you're using an overcast stitch. If you have an edge cutting foot the results are very similar. If not then use the "G" foot. Tiny irregularities get caught up in the stitching and larger ones can be trimmed away later.
PermalinkPermalink 06/09/14 @ 09:47
Heather McNaughton

In response to: 1887 Cascade Overskirt - TV367

Judy, you can buy the pattern at http://www.trulyvictorian.net/tvxcart/product.php?productid=125&cat=5&page=1
PermalinkPermalink 01/05/14 @ 16:49
judypowell

In response to: 1887 Cascade Overskirt - TV367

judypowell [Member]
how do you buy this pattern pls
PermalinkPermalink 01/05/14 @ 12:31
Heather McNaughton

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

Gailynne, there are actually 4 burnous pleats in TV374. There are 2 in each corner; one on the long edge and one on the short edge, that meet up in the corner. So, if I am reading your post correctly, then yes, you have it right. Fold the short side towards the middle, and that is the first pleat, along the top long edge. Then fold the short edge as marked, bringing the middle to the where you ended the stitching at the corner. You end up with strange box-ish points sticking out. For the pattern, I chose the sew the pleats closed, rather than leave them open. Mostly so you wouldn't have to worry about hemming the corners. If you were to leave the pleats open, you would be taking the end points of the 2 pleats, and set them together at the corner, leaving two loops at each corner. One loop is half of the short side and the other loop is 1/4 of the long top edge. If that helps at all.
PermalinkPermalink 12/27/13 @ 18:23
gailynne

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

gailynne [Visitor]
Heather, I'm having difficulty in figuring out which way to fold the fabric into a burnouse pleat for the back of TV374 and the illustration is confusing. With the fabric laid lengthwise, do I start to fold the shorter end towards the CB and, stitch that down on the long edge? Where do I pick up the next point of fabric: at the end of the pleat mark along the short side of pattern piece, and then bring that up to the point where the first fold is stitched 1/2" from the fold edge? Advise, please!
PermalinkPermalink 12/27/13 @ 16:54
Linda Shoberg

In response to: Making a lace chemisette

Linda Shoberg [Visitor]
Brilliant! I had to read the whole thing before understanding, but I have not made a chemisette yet. Wonderful in black. Now I must have one of my own. Thanks for this!
PermalinkPermalink 12/25/13 @ 23:02
Heather McNaughton

In response to: 1887 Cascade Overskirt - TV367

It can be worn with any bustle.
PermalinkPermalink 12/05/13 @ 14:37
Karen

In response to: 1887 Cascade Overskirt - TV367

Karen [Visitor]
Is this only for the new, extra-large bustle, or will it also work with TV101?
PermalinkPermalink 12/05/13 @ 14:25
Malin

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

Malin [Visitor]
Thanks for this little tutorial! I'd definitely buy a pattern for the striped skirt on the left above, love it!
PermalinkPermalink 11/17/13 @ 07:01
Heather McNaughton

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

Ah, but that is the interesting part, you really don't see the wrong side of the fabric at all.
PermalinkPermalink 11/17/13 @ 02:15
DannyJane

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

DannyJane [Visitor]
Heather, yes a small hem would work for most fabrics that have a good 'wrong' side. But how fun it would be to flatline the piece with a contrasting fabric to show as the fabric ripples down!
PermalinkPermalink 11/16/13 @ 23:36
Heather McNaughton

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

DannyJane, that is a really good question. I have not been able to look inside an original garment, nor do they say in the descriptions exactly what they did to finish this edge. For my patterns, I put in a small hem. Though facing the edge would be another option, or even just using the selvedge along this edge.
PermalinkPermalink 11/16/13 @ 23:12
DannyJane

In response to: What is a Burnous Pleat?

DannyJane [Visitor]
This is a gorgeous way to reduce bulk. Thank you so much for this blog entry. I have only one further question. How do you finish the exposed edge of the fabric? Is it hemmed? Folded?

Now that I know what a bournous pleat is, I want to learn more about making them!
PermalinkPermalink 11/16/13 @ 18:47
Heather McNaughton

In response to: The Batternburg Tablecloth Edwardian Blouse

Claudette,

I am the last person to ask about dying things. For whatever reason, I have zero ability to dye anything a color that I want it to be. It either comes out some horrid color, or dyes unevenly. I talk to people all the time who dye things with great success. Drives me crazy!
PermalinkPermalink 09/19/13 @ 01:15
Heather McNaughton

In response to: New 1887 Trained Skirt Pattern

DannyJane

Any bodice can be made for a formal occation. It is more a matter of type of fabric and trims, rather than style, that denotes formality.
PermalinkPermalink 09/15/13 @ 11:31